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Workshop
@June 27, 4:30 - 6pm


Themes

Code

Title

Creative and Integrative Practice

W1

The Use of Mindfulness-based Dance Movement Therapy to Enhance Couple or Intimate Relationship

Creative and Integrative Practice

W2

Making a “Fortune Herb Bag”: A Journey to Experience the Healing Power from Simple Horticulture Process

Creative and Integrative Practice

W3

The Use of Children’s Grief Expressive Arts Workbook in Working with Children and their Families Facing Anticipatory Grief and Loss

Health and Mental Health

W4

Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health: Tools for Social Workers

Health and Mental Health

W5

Application of Neurobiology and Polyvagal Theory in Enhancing the Effectiveness of Psychotherapy and Improving the Well-being of Social Workers and Mental Health Professionals

Health and Mental Health

W6

Introducing Brief Therapy – The Intention Method To Resolve When You Are Stuck

Health and Mental Health

W7

Workshop on Family Therapy in Mental Health Care – Essential Treatment Skills and Interventions

Health and Mental Health

W8

Treatment of Binge Eating Behavior by Sandplay Therapy: Exploration of Spiritual Approach and Clinical Application

Social Development and Empowerment

W9

Expressive Arts Inspirations: Gender, Identity & Dignity

Social Work Education

W10

Blended Learning for Social Work Education

Social Work Education

W11

Workshop on Social Network Analysis and Social Work

Creative and Integrative Practice

W12

Experiencing Grounding and Resourcing: Essential Self-regulating Tools that Every Helping Professional Should Learn

Social Work Education

W13

Educating Social Workers on Suicide Assessment and Treatment: Introducing Needed Curriculum into Social Work Programs

Creative and Integrative Practice

W14

A Model to Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship – From Ideation Stage to Implementation

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Workshop 1:

The Use of Mindfulness-based Dance Movement Therapy to Enhance Couple or Intimate Relationship 


Simon Kwong-Wo Sgn DMT, RSW

Private Practitioner


Bereavement care is an integral part of end-of-life care, which is usually under-emphasized. Family have multi-dimensional needs when approaching the end-of-life with advanced conditions. Social workers, who are experts in working from a systematic and holistic perspective, are in a good position to offer bereavement care. In addition, bereavement care can be started before the death of patients, social workers at health care settings, schools and even family services centres can have roles in this special area. This workshop sets out to equip the participants with the updated knowledge related to grief and bereavement care. Through experiential exercises, participants will be introduced to a range of practical tips in facilitating the communications within the family before the death, in assessing risk and outcomes as well as in supporting bereaved persons after the death.


 

Workshop 2:

Making a “Fortune Herb Bag”: A Journey to Experience the Healing Power from Simple Horticulture Process


Bob Lau MSW, RSW, HT

Tung Wah Group of Hospitals Wong Chuk Hang Complex


In China, “Fortune Herb Bag” making was ancient tool for healing emotional disturbance, evil spirit, or disease. Evidence of their use can be found in Qin Dynasty. This 90 minute workshop aims to offer opportunities for participants to examine the positive psychological effects by making a personalized “Fortune Herb Bag”, with the use of herbs and plant rubbing. Participants will be able to understand, from principle to practice, how horticulture facilitates mental wellness, to learn the emotional benefits from some commonly herbs and plants as well as to create a personalized “fortune herb bag” to foster positive thinking.


In this workshop, particiapnts will make their own “Fortune Herb Bag”, regarding needs from their body, and matching their personal style. After a brief introduction by the facilitator, range of herbs can be chosen and assembled into a tiny bag. Participant will further decorate the bag by rubbing technique of selected vegetable/ flower patterns with their imagination and ability to create. The “Fortune Herb Bag” making process is an opportunity for restoration and self-healing, and the good smell of the bag can stay for years. All participants will work together throughout the creative process and you can share your experience at the end of the workshop.


Creative use of horticultural approach in social work practice will be demonstrated as an example for to promote mental wellness. Feedback from participants of similar workshop also reported a range of benefits across emotional, social, vocational, physical and spiritual domains. Positive effects for service users, including reduced symptoms of depression and anxiety, were also found.

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Workshop 3:

The Use of Children’s Grief Expressive Arts Workbook in Working with Children and their Families Facing Anticipatory Grief and Loss


Dr Eve Wai-Lan Wong PsyD, MSW, EXAT, CST, PCCC(Hons)

The University of Hong Kong

Brenda Hang-Wah Choi M/Con, EXAT

Sheng Kung Hui


This presentation will share the experiences of using of a newly published Children’s Grief Expressive Arts (EXArts) Workbook in working with children and their families facing anticipatory grief and loss. Children’s grief is usually an ignored subject, not to mentioned children’s anticipatory grief, in the Hong Kong Chinese context. Children who are facing their loved one experiencing life threatening illness or even death and dying often felt alone in their grieving journey as their feelings are frequently misunderstood and ignored by their family and community. From the experiences of the use of EXArts Workbook in working with children and their families facing grief and loss, expressive arts activities were used to response to the unique needs of these grieving children and their family members, to help others understand the painful impact of anticipatory grief or death on children and the imperative for support, as well as to raise public awareness on children’s grief so that all children who have lost someone endearing to them know that they are not alone in their grieving journey. The presenters will illustrate through case studies of the use of EXArts Workbook to conduct therapeutic sessions and walk with children and their families through the journey of grieving in inducing the senses of hope, resilience as well as capacities in facing future life challenges and adversities. 

An EXArts Workbook will be introduced and given to participants as a hands-on resource for them to attempt to start working with children and their families facing anticipatory grief and bereavement. Participants will also be able to learn the needs of children and their families facing anticipatory grief and bereavement to enhance their future empowerment work on public awareness on this issue through collaboration with different parties from the community.


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Workshop 4:

Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health: Tools for Social Workers

Dr Bernadette Marson PhD, ACSW, LCSW-R

Fredonia State University


Social workers and mental health professionals have been working hard to treat service users with mental illnesses, trauma, addiction and other difficult conditions. Since there are hundreds of psychotherapy models being developed over the years, it has been intriguing to both researchers and practitioners about the key to the success of psychotherapy. 


This workshop will focus on several important neurobiological findings and the polyvagal theory, elaborating on their practical applications in improving the effectiveness psychotherapy and improving the well-being of social workers and mental health professionals. The speakers have been involved in trauma-informed therapy for addictions, in which compassion fatigue and secondary trauma are common for professionals in the field. We will share how the same knowledge and skills applying to improve therapy efficacy, as well as to self-care and prevention of burnout. The same principles would be informative to other psychotherapy interventions, and modalities. 


With the help of neuroscience, we are able to observe how our brain operates in different context, and we are starting to be able to appreciate the common factors that lead to therapeutic success across modalities and approaches. Thanks to the fast advances in technology, which leads to the explosive increase in scientific findings in neuroscience in the past two decades, there has been a growing understanding about our brain and body. This paradigm shift is gradually forming in the field of psychotherapy and mental health treatments.


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Workshop 5:

Application of Neurobiology and Polyvagal Theory in Enhancing the Effectiveness of Psychotherapy and Improving the Well-being of Social Workers and Mental Health Professionals

Dr Timothy Lam PsyD, MA(CP)

Dr Cora Mei-Kuen Lau PsyD, MA(CP), MSSc(SW)

Esther Ming-Yin Cheung BSSc(SW), RSW

Hong Kong Lutheran Social Service 


Social workers and mental health professionals have been working hard to treat service users with mental illnesses, trauma, addiction and other difficult conditions. Since there are hundreds of psychotherapy models being developed over the years, it has been intriguing to both researchers and practitioners about the key to the success of psychotherapy.  This workshop will focus on several important neurobiological findings and the polyvagal theory, elaborating on their practical applications in improving the effectiveness psychotherapy and improving the well-being of social workers and mental health professionals. The speakers have been involved in trauma-informed therapy for addictions, in which compassion fatigue and secondary trauma are common for professionals in the field. We will share how the same knowledge and skills applying to improve therapy efficacy, as well as to self-care and prevention of burnout. The same principles would be informative to other psychotherapy interventions, and modalities. 


With the help of neuroscience, we are able to observe how our brain operates in different context, and we are starting to be able to appreciate the common factors that lead to therapeutic success across modalities and approaches. Thanks to the fast advances in technology, which leads to the explosive increase in scientific findings in neuroscience in the past two decades, there has been a growing understanding about our brain and body. This paradigm shift is gradually forming in the field of psychotherapy and mental health treatments.


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Workshop 6:

Introducing Brief Therapy – The Intention Method To Resolve When You Are Stuck

Rebecca Szeto  

Private Practitioner


When Mothers have lived through difficulties times, more and more research shows (Bowlby 1988, Atia Daud et al. 2005, Yahude, et al. 2015, Adam Klosin et al. 2017, Olga Khazan 2018) that earlier imprints may transfer to the next generations. Professor Dr. Franz Ruppert from Munich University has developed a brief therapy method for resolving such issues (1995, 2008, 2010, 2013). The Intention Method enables you to treat often difficult issues without lengthy history investigations. It requires a sentence of maximum five to seven words. This enables the client to realise and understand the deeper unconscious structure of his own issue. As an example, one client presented her issue about the relationship with her Mother, “From a young age, I know my mother thought of me as her rival. She felt my father loved me more than he loved her. I always thought only my mother was jealous of me, but later I found out that I had similar experiences on many levels in my life.” Her sentence was “I love money freedom and projects” During the process, the core of the problem was revealed, “I never thought that this jealousy feeling was not from my mother… but from my father’s previous unfinished relationships, before my parents got married”. It turned out that her mother was also a ‘victim’. The jealousy feelings were transferred into her life and her relationships with others. That evening, it was the very first time, she feels love from her mother.


This workshop aims to present Ruppert’s method and a live demonstration. Since it was introduced, hundreds of professionals have been trained in Europe and four well-attended International Conferences were held (2012, 2014, 2016, 2018).

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Workshop 7:

Workshop on Family Therapy in Mental Health Care – Essential Treatment Skills and Interventions


Dr Oi-Ling Wong BSc, MPhil, MMedSc, PhD

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University


Because the specific patterns of human interaction in which we are embedded in daily living have a profound influence on our experiences and mental well-being, a shift in focus from the personal to the interpersonal is extremely relevant to psychiatric assessment and treatment. In this interactive workshop, participants will explore some of the complexities of human relationships revolving around clinical mental health problems and initiatives toward solutions. The workshop will provide a systemic and strengths-based framework for inquiring, understanding and intervening patterns of interaction to working relationally with families with mental health challenges. A map that orients both social work professionals and families in their efforts toward patterns of wellness will be introduced. The ideas of the relational practice approach to mental health care will be richly illustrated with clinical materials. 


Course Objectives

1. To acquire a systemic orientation in case formulation;

2. To learn the skills of listening-and-talking relationally; and

3. To distinguish and assess interpersonal patterns of interaction.

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Workshop 8:

Treatment of Binge Eating Behavior by Sandplay Therapy: Exploration of Spiritual Approach and Clinical Application


George Kar-Kin Kwok MSW, BSc, ISST-CST-T

Private Practitioner


Sandplay therapy has become one of the well-known expressive therapy in Hong Kong since its introduction. To express the inexpressible through the medium of sand, water and different figures in a free and protected space helped many clients to initiate the self-healing journey in a spiritual way. Unlike other creative arts therapy, sandplay therapy allowed the clients to use sand, water and a variety of miniatures that facilitate the creative process and treating not only children but also for adolescent and adult clients. 

Binge eating behavior is not uncommon among many depressive females. The repeated, endless vicious cycle of eating/vomiting tortured many clients, usually accompanied not only with psychological pain, shameful feeling but also alimentary injury in their body. Expressive therapy was one of the spiritually orientated treatments for helping these suffering souls. Marian Woodman, sandplay therapist, once mentioned that “Only then will she be able to nourish herself, and thereby transform a demonic ritual into a sacred one. The time may come when eating may be simply mundane, but until food loses its numinosity, eating for her will have to be a sacred rite”. 

In this workshop, the sandplay process of the female client, alias Mary, would be demonstrated with the elaboration of its clinical application. She has suffered from chronic depression for a long time and binge eating in recent years due to early traumatic family history and recent stresses. Her healing journey through sandplay therapy showed us how sandplay process helped the inner transformation and the treatment of Mary. The sandplay images also illustrated the inner nourishment and the transformation from a demonic to a sacred ritual as described by Woodman.

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Workshop 9:

Expressive Arts Inspirations: Gender, Identity & Dignity


Meko Pui-Wah Ng MSSc (SW), RSW, REAT

CEASE Crisis Centre, Tung Wah Group of Hospitals


Genders to certain extent build our identities. As social workers, our gender identities may impact our attitude and perceptions when rendering services to our clients. At the same time, would the gender identities of our clients also affect our professional intervention in the empowerment process? It is easy to overlook that each individual is a mixture of masculinity and femininity, while we are trained or socialized to have a predominant nature to express. I am a social worker who supports female survivors of sexual trauma over ten years. Sometimes, I find that I may overlook the masculine side of my clients, and facilitate the treatment process in a feminine way. To facilitate an expressive arts workshop in which helping professionals can have self-reflection on gender issues. This expressive arts workshop provides a non-judgemental and safe space for helping professionals to reflect upon gender issues and the empowerment process in their work. Expressive arts is a kind of creative language which involves the body and all five senses, and can connect people via a deeper, more authentic personal experience of various challenges that people face in life. It also provides a way for people to release, explore and transform their internal experience. Helping professionals can explore their authentic experience during the art process. To aware of the influence of our gender identities on professional interventions for our service users.

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Workshop 10:

Blended Learning for Social Work Education

Prof Ching-Man Lam BSSc, MSW, PhD, RSW

Dr Terry Tse-Fong Leung PhD, MA, BsocSci, RSW 

Dr Ching-Wen Chang PhD, MSW, BA(Social Work) 

The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Dr Siu-Man Ng BHSc(ChiMed), MSc(PsySW), PhD, RSW

The University of Hong Kong

Dr Esther Chow PhD, RSW, MNTCW (Melb & Dulwich)

Prof Samuel Mun-Yin Ho BSocSci, MSocSci (Clinical Psychology), PhD

City University of Hong Kong 


This cross-university collaborative project involves all five UGC-funded social work programs in Hong Kong to develop a reflection-based, user-oriented pedagogical model for social work education. The model adopts a blended approach as an innovative, ground-up response to current challenges in social work education, including limited opportunities for discussion due to increased curricular content, lecture-based teaching that restricts reflection, and the need for social work learning that balances local and international contexts. The project uses the newly available technologies to integrate online and traditional face-to-face learning, and adopting blended learning strategies to develop a reflection-based, user-oriented pedagogical model for social work education in Hong Kong.
 
The workshop shares our newly developed online teaching tools (e.g. teaching videos, animations, flipped classroom materials, VR etc.). Workshop will be organized as follow: Presentation 1: Blended learning for Social Work Education: Overview on pedagogies, conceptual framework and project design, Ching Man LAM.  Presentation 2: Stimulating informed arguments for policy debate: The case of welfare reform; Terry LEUNG Tse Fong. Presentation 3: Understanding mental health practice in context: the use of e-learning materials in teaching “Human Behaviour and the Social Environment II; Siu Man NG. Presentation 4: Erik Erikson’s theory of Psychosocial Development – An animation for quick review of the theory; Mun Yin HO & Esther CHOW. Presentation 5: Blended approach in case work teaching; Ching Wen Chang.

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Workshop 11:

Workshop on Social Network Analysis and Social Work

Prof Kanagaraj Easwaren PhD, BA (Social Work), PgD (Economy), BA

Department of Social Work, Mizoram University, India 


Social work promotes wellbeing of individuals through betterment of human relations at multilevel. Social network analysis helps social workers to understand human relations concretely. It facilitates social workers to translate metaphors such as social group, organisation, social structure into concrete measures and visuals. Sociometry invented by JL Moreno has evolved into social network analysis with the application of matrix algebra and graph theory as well employment of computers. The present workshop intends to introduce the basics of global social network analysis and personal network analysis. Social network analysis would help social workers to understand the pattern of relations at the level of groups, organisations and communities at large while personal or ego centric network analysis helps us focusing on individual actors and the relations around them. Collection of social and personal network data, entry of data and analysis of data will be demonstrated. This will be useful to practitioners and social work educators.

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Workshop 12:

Experiencing Grounding and Resourcing: Essential Self-regulating Tools that Every Helping Professional Should Learn


Fanny Yuet Fun Ko MSW, RSW, RN(Midwife)

Private Practitioner


Social work is a profession with high stress and responsibility. In order to enable workers to move alongside with the rapidly changing society, it is not enough just to equip them with skills to help others. They also need to learn ways to take care of themselves, to strengthen their resilience and to prevent burnout or vicarious traumas. This workshop combines the essence of the author’s learning and practice in Somatic Experiencing and Wholebody Focusing. Based on theory of neuroscience, participants will be guided to experience two simple tools for self-regulation: Grounding and Resourcing.

Grounding, by its literal meaning, is to feel the solid connection to the earth and to get support from the ground. While Resourcing, covers a wider area, refers to whatever support that can assist physical, emotional, mental and spiritual well-being. These can either be internal (such as a personality characteristic) or external (such as support from family members, friends and pets). The emphaiss is not just by thinking but experiencing the positive changes inside the body. Through simple exercises, participants will experience how their states of being can be improved just within a few minutes. If social workers learn these tools, they can become more resilient to face challenges of work and daily lives. Their capacities to solve problems will also be greatly enhanced. After practiced long enough, they can as well teach their clients these skills and be clients’ good role models.

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Workshop 13:

Educating Social Workers on Suicide Assessment and Treatment: Introducing Needed Curriculum into Social Work Programs


Dr Robin Gearing

University of Houston, USA

Dr Dana Alonzo 

Fordham University


The prevalence rates of suicide ideation, attempt, and completions continue to rise, directly challenging the skills of practicing social workers and social work educators. The WHO estimates that by 2020 the global rate of suicide will rise above 1.5 million annually. Social Work programs have an opportunity to move this issue out from the shadows and into the classroom. With only 2% of Social Work programs having a dedicated course on suicide prevention, few programs prepare students to manage suicidal behaviors. Social Workers encounter suicidal patients on a regular basis, with up to 87% reporting working with a suicidal client within the past year, yet, often receive limited training focused on assessing, managing and treating suicidal clients. Although social workers are in a unique position within health/mental health services, most social workers report feeling ill-equipped to access, support, refer, and work with suicidal clients, and to manage such issues into the classroom. Social workers often receive limited training focused on assessing, managing and treating this population, and minimal faculty and staff training to identify at-risk students, support suicidal students and to connect them to available campus-based mental health services. To address this serious gap, this presentation will focus on innovative methods for incorporating strategies, tools, and skills into the clinical practice classroom related to working effectively with youth at risk of suicidality. Also, this presentation will provide social work practitioners and educators (faculty/staff) core strategies on suicide assessment and treatment. 

The objectives are: 1. Indicate the learning outcomes participants will achieve by attending the workshop; 2 Improving social work educators awareness to detect potential students with suicidality; 3 Providing social educators with the knowledge necessary to integrate suicide discussions into classroom; 4 Identifying methods for social work educators to connect students with services and resources on campus and in the community.


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Workshop 14:

A Model to Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship – From Ideation Stage to Implementation


Dr Anita Kit-Ying Au PhD, RSW

Hong Kong Social Workers Association


Dr Chi-Tat Chan PhD, MPhil, BSW, PgDip, RSW

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University


Innovation has long been perceived as the core competency to excel from competitor in business sector. With the ever changing and multi-faceted landscape of social problems nowadays, social sector also begins to adopt innovativeness to achieve its better social solution. From simple innovation programs, to social enterprise, or to some larger scale social innovation projects, all of them are aimed at more effective and efficient service outcomes upon their service users. To better promote the innovativeness culture, HKSWA began to join with the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charity Trust and worked as its local partner on a social worker training program, namely, “Innopower@JC: Fellowships for teachers and social workers”. The project aims at nurturing teachers and social workers as innovative changemakers in schools or organizations through personal and professional development opportunities and cross-sector network. As local partner, HKSWA has been going through with stakeholders the journey of brainstorming the project design to attending oversea innovative training, in which numbers of insight were gained and will be shared in this workshop. Project participants will also share their firsthand transforming experience. One group of participants will share particularly their experience of ideation stage whereas another group of participants will share their innovative project implementation stage. 

The co-author will also share his experience of launching the Human Libraries Hub (HLH) project in this workshop. This presentation will illustrate in what ways practical challenges, theoretical orientations, non-social work ideas, and technology literacy might have shaped a practitioner/researcher to synthesize new and innovative forms of practice. Hurdles and future directions of innovativeness in social work practice will also be discussed.

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